therapeutic

Brent, disabled angler, explains how important angling is to him

My disability is osteogenesis imperfecta which is brittle bones; this can mean that the smallest of knocks can result in a broken bone. I have to take morphine-based pain relief everyday and I can no longer walk unaided and have to use a wheelchair most of the time. This obviously restricts what I can do now ... I think angling is an extremely positive experience. It can invigorate me in a way no other activity can. I find that I can be completely engrossed in angling, and the whole experience, whilst tiring, gives me a boost mentally.

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Councillor Mrs Jean O’Donnell on the tranquillity of angling

There’s a certain discipline with regard to fishing. It’s not one of your wild activities. There's something really rather pleasant and calming about it which I think has an effect on the psyche. Water is particularly good for people, even just looking at water or listening to it. I think it appeals to something deep inside us, the tranquillity and the oneness with nature that you don’t always get. You can stop and think about things. You can unwind. You can unwind at the riverside. Not that youngsters have much to unwind. But I like this idea, it calms their mind.

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Sarah, who has a son with cerebral palsy, talks about fishing at Albrighton Moat & Gardens

It's not far from where we live and a nice day out for Dylan - because, obviously, he can't do a lot. It's nice and quiet here and especially like this on a day when the weather's nice, it's very relaxing. He gets to look at the fish, feel the fish, and interact with the other children.
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