Recreational Sea Fishing

Economic impact of recreational sea angling in Scotland

Author: 
Radford, A., Riddington, G. and Gibson, H.
Date: 
July 2009

Previously, very little was known about the scale of sea angling, its distribution across Scotland, or the economic impact of sea anglers’ expenditure. In these circumstances, it is possible that sea angling could have been over-looked when fisheries, tourism and coastal developments were being considered. The Scottish Government has sought to rectify this by commissioning this assessment of sea angling and its contribution to employment and income both in Scotland as a whole and its regions.

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Invest in Fish South West Report: The motivation, demographics and views of South West recreational anglers and their socio-economic impact on the region

Author: 
Nautilus Consultants
Date: 
5/16/2005

Recreational sea anglers are directly affected and sometimes restricted by fisheries management policies. The Motivation, Demographics and Views of South West Recreational Sea Anglers and their Socio-economic Impact on the Region provides insight into anglers’ views of current fisheries management policies and their suggestions for future management options.

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Research into the economic contribution of sea angling

Author: 
Drew Associates
Date: 
2004

Existing information about the economic characteristics of sea angling in England and Wales is sparse. This study was established to provide more detailed economic information on sea anglers and sea angling in England and Wales. Specifically, it was set up principally to identify the important local centres for sea angling, its economic contribution both nationally and more locally, and the value of the experience to anglers.

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Saltwater sportfishing for food or income in the Northeastern US:Statistical estimates and policy implications

Author: 
Steinback, S., Wallmo, K. and Clay, P.
Date: 
2009
Journal: 
Marine Policy, 33, 49-57

In the Northeast US fishery managers have attempted to control marine recreational fishing mortality through annual adjustments to the number and/or size of fish that can be kept. These measures, with a few exceptions, have generally failed to prevent recreational fishing mortality rates from exceeding annual target levels. In this study, we show that one of the reasons why keep limits may have failed is that a substantial number of anglers obtain little value from being able to keep self-caught fish.

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